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ciphergoth comments on Imitation is the Sincerest Form of Argument - Less Wrong Discussion

72 Post author: palladias 18 February 2013 05:05PM

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Comment author: ChristianKl 19 February 2013 06:53:50PM 4 points [-]

For example, a liberal Christian complained that her (honest!) Christian answer did very poorly, because people associated liberalism with atheism. This suggests that the best strategy isn't necessarily to honestly list what you believe, but to list what you think a typical member of the group involved believes.

It depends how you define poorly. Her answer demostrated something useful about inaccurate stereotypes of Christianity. If the goal of the whole exercise is to convince others that Christianity is right, then her answer might be good because it teaches people about their misconceptions about Christianity.

Comment author: ciphergoth 19 February 2013 08:31:31PM 3 points [-]

Yes. If you're faking it, the measure is how many people you fool. If you're guessing, the measure is how many you get right. But if you're writing honestly, there's no winning or losing; just write honestly, and if people guess you wrong more fool them.

Comment author: ChristianKl 21 February 2013 03:02:10PM *  1 point [-]

But if you're writing honestly, there's no winning or losing

I don't think you understand the point of the game. The goal of the game isn't to guess the teachers password. palladias converted to Catholism after running that game. That's a win for the catholics in the game who honestly explained catholicsm to her.

Of of the catholics wrote that he likes SMBC. That's one of the examples that struck out to palladias. Even when it reduced the judging scores of the answer, I think that answer likely increase the chances of "turning" palladias.

Comment author: ciphergoth 22 February 2013 12:36:09PM 3 points [-]

Ah, so you're saying that the goal of the honest participant is for the guessers to distinguish correctly, showing that their counterparts have a poor understanding of their beliefs?

Comment author: Kindly 22 February 2013 02:23:40PM *  0 points [-]

Your argument is too general: it applies to any game. If I play chess against a Catholic, who deliberately throws the game in order to make a clever argument that succeeds in converting me to Catholicism, that counts as a win of some sort... but not a win in chess.

Comment author: ChristianKl 22 February 2013 04:23:10PM 2 points [-]

If I play chess against a Catholic, who deliberately throws the game in order to make a clever argument that succeeds in converting me to Catholicism, that counts as a win of some sort... but not a win in chess.

I think that this game is inherently about showing that your ideology is better than the one of the people on the other side. Chess is generally not played with that intent.

Comment author: Ishaan 10 September 2013 08:49:04PM -1 points [-]

palladias converted to Catholism after running that game.

Wait, did that actually happen? Is there a place where I can read about how and why?