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ColbyDavis comments on A Guide to Rational Investing - Less Wrong Discussion

26 Post author: ColbyDavis 15 September 2014 02:36AM

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Comment author: ColbyDavis 16 September 2014 06:50:02PM 1 point [-]

There's nothing I strongly disagree with with what you just said, but I think you are probably underestimating the heterogeneity of peoples' financial lives and the degree to which many people enjoy a personal touch.

Things like medicine and legal assistence need to be personalized because different people have >significantly different medical and legal issues, but investment?

Since I have started working in my current role I have been impressed with just how complex and particular an individual's financial situation can be, especially when dealing with high net worth individuals well into their career. Multiple accounts with different tax treatment, employee stock grants and options, insurance, inheritance, real estate holdings, dependents, charitable giving, trusts, required minimum distributions, loans and other financial obligations, etc. are all things I regularly encounter and deal with in considering portfolio construction. Add to this the fact that most people are very emotionally invested in and/or have ugh fields about their money and are prone to making foolish mistakes like selling at the bottom of a bear market (I've seen it from people who I know understand the efficient markets hypothesis) and you can see why there is a market for financial professionals who personally know their client and can hold them responsible to their financial goals. Not that everybody needs this, but I think younger people who have never had (or lost) a lot of money underestimate this aspect.

That said, I more or less agree with your point, and I think in a more competitive market there would be larger scale corporate consolidation in this market, along with law and medicine as well. One thing law, medicine, and finance all have in common is a system of occupational licensing and other cartelization policies in place that protect incumbents.

Betterment and WealthFront are trying to push our industry in that direction and have so far been quite successful for themselves. I would not be surprised, however, if after the next bear market their reputations take a hit when investors panic and hit the sell button when there's nobody there to talk them off the cliff. Maybe that won't happen. Time will tell.

I don't mean to imply that that all financial advisers are charlatans.

Thanks! =)

Part of the reason I got in the business I am in is because there is so much bullshit in the financial industry. I would like to try to bring a little more sanity to it, because I do think it is so important for our economy. This paper is part of my efforts to do so. I hope you appreciate it.

Comment author: V_V 16 September 2014 10:07:14PM 1 point [-]

Multiple accounts with different tax treatment, employee stock grants and options, insurance, inheritance, real estate holdings, dependents, charitable giving, trusts, required minimum distributions, loans and other financial obligations, etc. are all things I regularly encounter and deal with in considering portfolio construction. Add to this the fact that most people are very emotionally invested in and/or have ugh fields about their money and are prone to making foolish mistakes like selling at the bottom of a bear market (I've seen it from people who I know understand the efficient markets hypothesis) and you can see why there is a market for financial professionals who personally know their client and can hold them responsible to their financial goals.

I see. It is certainly possible that I tend to underestimate the complexity of this industry due to my lack of expertise.

Part of the reason I got in the business I am in is because there is so much bullshit in the financial industry. I would like to try to bring a little more sanity to it, because I do think it is so important for our economy. This paper is part of my efforts to do so. I hope you appreciate it.

It is difficult for me to evaluate your paper. Anyway, good luck!