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johnlawrenceaspden comments on The Thyroid Madness : Core Argument, Evidence, Probabilities and Predictions - Less Wrong Discussion

10 Post author: johnlawrenceaspden 14 March 2016 01:41AM

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Comment author: johnlawrenceaspden 16 March 2016 11:27:44PM 0 points [-]

Nicely done, thank you! My brain is broken, and this "informal reasoning" is harder than it looks.

In your case, the X-ray test is doing its job perfectly. And if the posited type 2 hypothyroidism needs different treatment from the type 1 version, which it probably would, then the TSH test will be a great way to tell them apart.

What I don't think you're allowed to do is say 'no problem, can't be anything to do with your car crash' when what you mean is 'your skull is not fractured'.

So the TSH test is a great test for TSH, and probably a good test for circulating thyroid hormones (although it doesn't give the whole picture). But I don't think that means that the TSH test is a good test for 'no thyroid hormone-related problem'.

Do we still disagree? Can I phrase my A&B&C=>(D OR E) thing better? Or do I need to abandon it?

Perhaps: Hypothyroidism (by which I mean any failure of thryoid hormones to act on cells).....

Comment author: Jiro 17 March 2016 03:49:57AM 0 points [-]

What I don't think you're allowed to do is say 'no problem, can't be anything to do with your car crash' when what you mean is 'your skull is not fractured'.

That example only works because fractures are involved in a subset of car crashes and car crashes are involved in a subset of fractures; either one can happen without the other. If that relation doesn't hold true, you would be allowed to say that. For instance, saying "no problem, can't be anything to do with your car crash' when what you mean is 'you weren't anywhere near a car at the time of the crash'.

Comment author: johnlawrenceaspden 18 March 2016 05:31:50PM 0 points [-]

Agree again, thanks