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Comment author: btrettel 29 June 2017 02:44:07AM 1 point [-]

You'd be more likely to get some kind of waves that propagate at fixed speed along the grid, giving you a privileged rest frame, like in the old discredited theories of aether.

I'll try to steelman Florian_Dietz.

I don't know much anything about relativity, but waves on a grid in computational fluid dynamics (CFD for short) typically don't have the problem you describe. I do vaguely recall some strange methods that do in a Lagrangian CFD class I took, but they are definitely non-standard and I think were used merely as simple illustrations of a class of methods.

Plus, some CFD methods like the numerical method of characteristics discretize in different coordinates that follow the waves. This can resolve waves really well, but it's confusing to set up in higher dimensions.

CFD methods are just particularly well developed numerical methods for physics. From what I understand analogous methods are used for computational physics in other domains (even relativity).

Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 29 June 2017 08:23:34AM 0 points [-]

I don't know much anything about relativity, but waves on a grid in computational fluid dynamics (CFD for short) typically don't have the problem you describe.

Not even for wavelengths not much longer than the grid spacing?

Comment author: Thomas 26 June 2017 10:51:10AM 0 points [-]

you cannot do that: the euclidean norm is not defined for an infinite-dimensional space.

Why not? It is the square root of the sum of (dxi)^2, where i goes through all dimensions. Sometimes it is a finite value. Otherwise the distance is infinite.

The points T0(0,0,0,0....) and T1(0,1/sqrt(2),1/sqrt(4),1/sqrt(8)...) are 1 apart.

Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 26 June 2017 01:05:32PM *  0 points [-]

Otherwise the distance is infinite.

A metric is supposed to be always finite. Note the round right bracket in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_(mathematics)#Definition.

In response to comment by gjm on Any Christians Here?
Comment author: lmn 25 June 2017 05:56:53PM 0 points [-]

it seems to me that you want the threat known to a small number of people and to persuade them to work towards a highly specific goal that those people are particularly well-suited to achieving.

Not really. In fact one reason for universality is to discourage reactions like Eliezer's.

In response to comment by lmn on Any Christians Here?
Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 25 June 2017 10:29:54PM 0 points [-]

How so?

In response to comment by gjm on Any Christians Here?
Comment author: lmn 22 June 2017 03:45:45AM 0 points [-]

Christian doctrines as morally monstrous (hell)

Why is punishing bad people morally monstrous?

probably internally incoherent (Trinity, dual nature of Christ)

Do you also find the scientific doctrine of light, and mater, being both particle and wave internally incoherent.

In response to comment by lmn on Any Christians Here?
Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 25 June 2017 10:15:32PM *  0 points [-]

Do you also find the scientific doctrine of light, and mater, being both particle and wave internally incoherent.

Depending on what exactly you mean by "particle" that's either no less tautological than dogs being both mammals and animals or a possibly-only-approximate provisional model (complete with well-studied mathematical techniques to sweep the consequences of the incoherence under the rug) we're using while we figure out how to extend quantum field theory down to the quantum gravity scale and beyond.

Comment author: Viliam 21 June 2017 11:25:19AM *  1 point [-]

Artistic pursuits may be "upper-class", but they are not unproductive. They serve to keep the upper classes practiced in physical cognition, counteracting a tendency to shift entirely into social modes of cognition (gossip and status-signaling games) as one ascends the social ladder. This is very important for the quality of decisions they make as leaders of society. (...) The fact that there has been such a decline in interest and participation in high culture among the upper classes is very worrying

Ok, allow me to say it using my own words:

Roughly, human pursuits can be divided into "social games" such as gossip or conspiracies, which are usually zero-sum, or even negative-sum as they often compete in sacrificing to Moloch everything that does not provide immediate social value, and "games with nature" such as work, science, but also sports and that part of art which requires skill e.g. playing the piano (as opposed to "modern art" which is merely about who makes a media hype around you, so it requires allies instead of technical skills). The word "game" is used here as in "game theory", i.e. it may or may not refer to playful activities.

And there is a risk that when people climb the social ladder, they lose touch with "games with nature", because they delegate it to people lower than them on the social ladder. With the horrifying consequence that people who rule the world may actually understand it the least. I mean, they certainly understand the social aspects of the world, that's what they specialize at, so they are good at e.g. organizing a revolution; but they have no idea how to grow grain or cook bread, so the revolution is typically followed by bread shortage and lot of suffering.

Having upper-class people spend some time doing "games with nature" may keep them more sane, and as a result keep the whole society more sane. But, frankly, the "games with nature" are typically motivated, directly or indirectly, by survival (you grow grain and cook bread to avoid starvation, you learn science inter alie to achieve job safety which is to avoid starvation), and this motivation does not apply to the upper class. Having them do sports or (skill-based) art may be the only chance to get them in contact with non-social aspects of reality. Of these two, sports are more about body, and are quite repetitive, while art is more about mind and creativity.

Is this approximately right?

I still think that if someone is doing math or programming, they already have their dose of "games with nature" there. But if a rich programmer has a child that dislikes math and computing... I agree that skill-based art is better than most of the alternatives.

I update that if actual upper-class people want their child to play piano, there may be actually a very healthy instinct behind that. (Or may be just blindly copying what their neighbors do.)

Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 22 June 2017 11:46:35PM 0 points [-]

you learn science inter alie to achieve job safety

LOL

Comment author: Lumifer 21 June 2017 03:13:21PM 0 points [-]

Any superintelligence that achieves human values will be adjacent in design space to many superintelligences that cause massive suffering

Why so? Flipping the sign doesn't get you "adjacent", it gets you "diametrically opposed".

If you really want chocolate ice cream, "adjacent" would be getting strawberry ice cream, not having ghost pepper extract poured into your mouth.

Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 21 June 2017 04:05:24PM 1 point [-]

They said "adjacent in design space". The Levenshtein distance between return val; and return -val; is 1.

Comment author: MaryCh 11 June 2017 03:30:42PM *  0 points [-]

Ethanol has that OH group. It's a polar molecule, and a small one. But take two pure long-chained fatty acids, mix well, and then what will happen? (I said "oils" to show I didn't mean a "hydrophobic in polar" solution, which I hadn't thought the question implied.)

Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 12 June 2017 03:49:09PM *  0 points [-]

Ethanol has that OH group. It's a polar molecule, and a small one.

Yes, I was just mentioning it as an example.

But take two pure long-chained fatty acids, mix well, and then what will happen?

I guess they stay mixed. They are pretty similar molecules, so the forces that hold e.g. oleic acid molecules together so that it doesn't evaporate (Van der Waals, I think?) can just as well hold oleic acid molecules to e.g. linoleic acid molecules. (Whereas since water molecules and oleic acid molecules are pretty different, the force between a water molecule and an oleic acid molecule is a lot smaller than between two water molecules or two oleic acid molecules.)

Comment author: MaryCh 11 June 2017 01:05:48PM 0 points [-]

So, they don't just form very small micelles within the body of the, well, liquid of which there's more there? (Iam speaking of very small amounts of the dissolved substance, since it is clear that if their amounts are comparable, they will just separate according to gravity.)

Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 11 June 2017 02:53:29PM 0 points [-]

So, they don't just form very small micelles within the body of the, well, liquid of which there's more there?

I don't think they would. After all, olive oil and sunflower oils are themselves mixtures of several different fatty acids.

if their amounts are comparable, they will just separate according to gravity

Not if they form a solution, which I think they do. After all it's not like if you leave a bottle of vodka alone all the water will sink to the bottom and all the ethanol will float to the top.

Comment author: lmn 20 May 2017 02:19:50AM 4 points [-]

If by "some" you literally meant nothing but "more than zero", fine. (But "some" people get harsh sentences for pretty much anything, so "some people get harsh sentences for X" is not very informative about how little X is tolerated.)

So you consider harsh sentences for pointing out true facts about migrant behavior to be reasonable as long as it only happens to "some" people? You may want to learn about how chilling effects on free speech work.

Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 21 May 2017 08:01:46AM *  1 point [-]

No, I don't. I was just pointing out that you picked a very disingenuous way of stating that. (You could have said instead, for example, "some people who said something mean about the migrants have gotten harsher sentences")

true facts

Huh. I've been living for a year in a city where most of the population is foreign-born (myself included) and it doesn't look like it's going to hell. In particular I feel safer here than in certain other places with many fewer immigrants.

You may want to learn about how chilling effects on free speech work.

Judging by the number of people I hear saying ridiculous things about migrants every day, I wonder what would happen if such "chilling effects" were not in place -- would my Facebook feed ever contain anything else at all?

Comment author: cousin_it 16 May 2017 04:32:25PM *  2 points [-]

There's a free market idea that the market rewards those who provide value to society. I think I've found a simple counterexample.

Imagine a loaf of bread is worth 1 dollar to consumers. If you make 100 loaves and sell them for 99 cents each, you've provided 1 dollar of value to society, but made 99 dollars for yourself. If you make 100 loaves and give them away to those who can't afford it, you've provided 100 dollars of value to society, but made zero for yourself. Since the relationship is inverted, we see that the market doesn't reward those who provide value. Instead it rewards those who provide value to those who provide value! It's recursive, like PageRank!

That's the main reason why we have so much inequality. Recursive systems will have attractors that concentrate stuff. That's also why you can't blame people for having no jobs. They are willing to provide value, but they can't survive by providing to non-providers, and only the best can provide to providers.

Comment author: Good_Burning_Plastic 19 May 2017 09:23:28AM 0 points [-]

If you make 100 loaves and sell them for 99 cents each, you've provided 1 dollar of value to society, but made 100 dollars for yourself.

Total, $101. (Society also includes you.)

If you make 100 loaves and give them away to those who can't afford it, you've provided 100 dollars of value to society, but made zero for yourself.

Total, $100.

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