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Comment author: NancyLebovitz 26 December 2016 02:44:13PM 0 points [-]

Thanks-- I had fun reading it, and it's definitely more exuberant than most utopias.

I wasn't crazy about the sandworm challenge for getting to be politically influential-- wouldn't it make more sense to work one's way up by being influential in smaller groups?

Probably too much for this story, but there'd also be basic research going on and changing things.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 23 December 2016 03:22:50PM 4 points [-]

A couple of minor points: I knew someone who was moderately disabled, lived alone, and had cats. Instead of chasing her cats down and wrestling them into cat carriers, she clicker-trained them to get into their carriers themselves. She was obviously smarter and stronger than Einstein.

As for Slavic pessimism, I'm inclined to think that an AI which attempts to self-improve is at grave risk of breaking itself.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 22 December 2016 08:12:24AM 3 points [-]

Possibly of interest: The Second Brain-- it's about the neurology of the digestive tract. It's harder than I thoughf for a body to manage having meat-digesting stomach acid in the middle of an organ. The author suggests that a lot of digestive problems are actually neurological rather than something wrong with specific organs.

It's from 1998, but I don't know of more recent books on the subject.

Comment author: Lumifer 21 December 2016 04:06:14PM 1 point [-]

My first intuitive reaction would be to interpret "the 1900s" as early XX century. I would not expect, say, the 80s and the 90s to be part of "the 1900s".

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 21 December 2016 04:24:02PM 0 points [-]

I wonder if that reaction can be avoided by saying something like "all the 1900s".

Comment author: arundelo 21 December 2016 03:11:29AM *  2 points [-]

Perfectly clear, and probably in most contexts less likely to elicit off-by-one errors. The only confusing things I can see are:

  • Maybe someone might think you just meant the first decade of the 1900s?
  • Similarly, is "the 2000s" a century or a decade or a millennium? (This and the previous problem are solved by using e.g., "19xx", but that's probably only clear in written language.)
  • This style (it seems to me) is more common with older stuff (e.g., the 1800s and 1700s), so someone might do a double-take at "the 1900s", thinking it sounds longer ago than it is.
  • There's also the thing of how the twentieth century is, if we're being pedantic, not the years 1900 through 1999, but the years 1901 through 2000.
Comment author: NancyLebovitz 21 December 2016 08:13:53AM 0 points [-]

The person who was confused was so used to "the nth century" that "the xx00s" didn't register as the same thing.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 21 December 2016 12:28:31AM 3 points [-]

In the hopes of making things easier for me, I've been referring to centuries by their number range-- "the 1900's" rather than "the twentieth century". I've gotten one piece of feedback from someone who found it confusing, but how clear is it to most people who are reading this?

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 20 December 2016 05:15:18PM 1 point [-]

Is a text for the Solstice Celebration available?

Comment author: shev 19 December 2016 11:25:12PM *  3 points [-]

Is there an index of everything I ought to read to be 'up-to-date' in the rationalist community? I keep finding new stuff: new ancient LW posts, new bloggers, etc. There's also this on the Wiki, which is useful (but is curiously not what you find when you click on 'all pages' on the wiki; that instead gets a page with 3 articles on it?). But I think that list is probably more than I want - a lot of it is filler/fluff (though I plan to at least skim everything, if I don't burn out).

I just want to be able to make sure, if I try to post something I think is new on here, that it hasn't been talked to death about already.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 20 December 2016 04:25:22AM 4 points [-]

I think you're better off raising your topics in open threads, and see whether people tell you a topic's already been covered.

[Link] Giving the results of scientific research away

1 NancyLebovitz 18 December 2016 04:43PM
Comment author: NancyLebovitz 09 December 2016 06:50:44PM 3 points [-]

The link worked for me-- maybe they made it public when asked, but didn't tell you.

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