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Comment author: NancyLebovitz 23 April 2014 11:04:32PM 0 points [-]
Comment author: tanagrabeast 23 April 2014 10:48:21PM 1 point [-]

Yes. Go laceless. I only discovered a few years ago that there is such thing as men's close-toed shoes that can be appropriate semi-formal workwear yet never need to be tied. I wear something roughly similar to this at work: Amazon and a more casual variation in my free time. Very comfortable, loose-sneaker feel on the inside. An elastic-bound tongue ensures uniform snugness, rather than fluctuating between too tight and too loose. Once broken in, you can slide them on and off without hands, as you might with slippers or flip-flops.

But more importantly than the ergonomics... why waste time time tying shoes? Why risk injury tripping over laces, or getting them caught places?

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 23 April 2014 11:01:57PM 1 point [-]

I'm going to check out the Scholl's shoes for women.

Meanwhile, if you happen to have lace-up shoes, there are permanent elastic laces. I agree that normal shoe laces add unnecessary work and risk to one's life, though I still think cloth laces are better looking.

Comment author: James_Miller 23 April 2014 08:45:12PM 0 points [-]

None online. I have read several books on the topic and undergo it myself.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 23 April 2014 09:10:29PM 0 points [-]

If you don't mind, what were the books, and what changes have you noticed in yourself?

Comment author: sixes_and_sevens 23 April 2014 12:17:03AM 1 point [-]

Fairly off-topic question, but I imagine there'll be suitable people to answer it on LW. Any recommendations for cheap and cheerful VPS hosting? Just somewhere to park a minimum CentOS install. It's for miscellaneous low-priority personal projects that I might abandon shortly after starting, so I'm hesitant to pay top dollar for a quality product that I might end up not using. On the other hand, I want to make sure I get what little I'm paying for.

I promise I'm not a stingy unfriendly AI looking for a new home.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 23 April 2014 08:38:23PM 0 points [-]
Comment author: James_Miller 23 April 2014 12:04:13AM *  1 point [-]

Consider neurofeedback administered by a professional. In the U.S. it will cost between $50/200 a session. You probably need at least 20 sessions for permanent results, but you might be able to feel some effects during the first session.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 23 April 2014 08:28:25PM 0 points [-]

Source of information about effectiveness and duration?

Comment author: wanderingimpromptu 23 April 2014 11:50:27AM 1 point [-]

Seconded. In particular if anyone has recommendations for comfortable plain black heels or heeled boots of medium-low height (2-3 inches), please share! I have flat feet and have been looking for un-painful heels my whole life.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 23 April 2014 05:51:48PM 2 points [-]

This probably isn't the best place to ask-- the proportion of women is fairly low.

Possibly useful: Orthotics for high heels

Running with the Whole Body-- I did the exercise about understanding the connection between hip movement and feet a couple of times, and had arches for a while.

Comment author: wanderingimpromptu 23 April 2014 11:50:27AM 1 point [-]

Seconded. In particular if anyone has recommendations for comfortable plain black heels or heeled boots of medium-low height (2-3 inches), please share! I have flat feet and have been looking for un-painful heels my whole life.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 23 April 2014 05:40:46PM 0 points [-]

This probably isn't the best place for asking-- the proportion of women is pretty low.

Might be useful: http://podpost.us/issue/nov-dec-20122013/article/best-five-orthotics-for-high-heeled-shoes

I did the exercise for understanding the connection between hips and turning feet side to side a couple of times, and had arches for a while. http://www.amazon.com/Running-Whole-Body-30-Day-Program/dp/1556432267/ref=pd_sim_sbs_b_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=05VZBT6K13PSF9JNNDHZ

Comment author: RomeoStevens 22 April 2014 11:48:52PM 0 points [-]

I've been trying to convince various people to buy more expensive shoes because their amortized cost winds up being similar to cheaper shoes.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 23 April 2014 03:37:10AM 1 point [-]

I've gone in the opposite direction. I have wide feet (8E), and now that I've found cheap but not terribly durable sneakers that fit, I just keep buying more of them.

In response to Ergonomics Revisited
Comment author: NancyLebovitz 22 April 2014 10:21:06PM 4 points [-]

Should shoes be added to the list?

Comment author: april_flower 21 April 2014 06:58:06PM 10 points [-]

How strong is the evidence in favor of psychological treatment really?

I am not happy. I suffer from social anxiety. I procrastinate. And I have a host of another issues that are all linked, I am certain. I have actually sought out treatment with absolutely no effect. On the recommendation of my primary care physician I entered psychoanalytic counseling and was appalled by the theoretical basis and practical course of "treatment". After several months without even the hint of a success I aborted the treatment and looked for help somewhere else.

I then read David Burns' "Feeling Good", browsing through, taking notes and doing the exercises for a couple of days. It did not help, of course in hindsight I wasn't doing the treatment long enough to see any benefit. But the theoretical basis intrigued me. It just made so much more sense to be determined by one's beliefs than a fear of having one's balls chopped off, hating their parents and actively seeking out displeasure because that is what fits the narrative.

Based on the key phrase "CBT" I found "The now habit" and reading me actually helped to subdue my procrastination long enough to finish my bachelor's degree in a highly technical subject with grades in the highest quintile. Then I slipped back into a phase of relative social isolation, procrastionation and so on.

We see these phenomena consistently in people. We also see them consistently in animals being held in captivity not suited to their species' specific needs. I am less and less convinced that this block of anxiety, depression and procrastination is a disease but a reaction to an environment in the broadest sense inherently unsuitable to humans.

The proper and accepted procedure for me would be to try counseling again, this time with a cognitive behavioral approach. But I am unwilling to commit that much time for uncertain results, especially now that I want to travel or do a year abroad or just run away from it all. (Suicide is not an option) What lowers my odds of success even more is that I never feel understood by people put in place to understand in various venues. So how could such a treatment help?

I am open to bibliotherapy. I don't think I am open to traditional or even medical therapy.

Comment author: NancyLebovitz 22 April 2014 11:13:39AM 2 points [-]

We see these phenomena consistently in people. We also see them consistently in animals being held in captivity not suited to their species' specific needs. I am less and less convinced that this block of anxiety, depression and procrastination is a disease but a reaction to an environment in the broadest sense inherently unsuitable to humans.

I've heard the idea from Somatic Experiencing-- unfortunately, I haven't found anything that goes into detail about that particular angle, except that part of it seems to be about having a tribe-- it's not just about spending time out of doors.

I'll be keeping an eye out for information on the subject, but meanwhile, you might want to look into Somatic Experiencing and Peter A. Levine.

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