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Comment author: Prometheus 03 September 2017 05:56:58AM 0 points [-]

I think contrarians are severely undervalued. I was originally a contrarian because 1: it's fun to have a whole room made at you; and 2: I always found it unnerving when a whole group of people all agreed on something, even if I mostly agreed with them. I found people's comfort zone discomforting. Now, thanks to my research into Group Think, and the evidence even one dissenter is enough to cast doubt on someone's perceptions and opinions, I've become something of a contrarian crusader. Pedophiles, terrorists, Nazis: the more toxic, the better. I do this for the reasons above... and because it's a whole lot of fun.

Comment author: James_Miller 23 August 2016 12:55:41AM 1 point [-]

Then the Fermi simulation paradox is "why is the universe so old?" If the universe gets quickly colonized then most of the simulations of civilizations that have not yet made contact with aliens will have universes much younger than ours.

Comment author: Prometheus 27 August 2016 05:15:12AM 0 points [-]

It could be the universe is only "old" by our standards. Maybe a few trillion years is a very young universe by normal standards, and it's only because we've been observing a simulation that it seems to be an "old" universe.

Comment author: Prometheus 27 August 2016 04:58:31AM 2 points [-]

There's also the possibility that the universe is filled with aliens, but they are quiet in order to hide themselves from a more advanced alien civilization or UFAI. And this advanced civilization or UFAI acts as a Great Filter to those who do not have the sense to conceal themselves from it. This would assume that somehow aliens had a way of detecting the presence of this threat, perhaps by intercepting messages from alien civilizations before they were destroyed by it. Either that, or there is no way of detecting the aliens or UFAI, and all civilizations are doomed to be destroyed by it as soon as they start emitting radio signals.

In response to Willpower Schedule
Comment author: Prometheus 24 August 2016 06:02:15PM 1 point [-]

I'm not sure if going to the bathroom is a "smart" adjustment between conscious and subconscious, or if it's closer to firing neurons in the region associated with it (that is to say, instead of a communication networks, it may be closer to just flipping on a switch). What would agree with the latter, is that studies show that the region of the brain associated with it is overly active when under the influence of alcohol. I think resting all day (and as a result, not wishing to do serious work) could probably be better explained by less blood flow to the brain (and as a result, less oxygen) due to lack of movement. On top of this, our bodies tend to operate in 12-hour cycles. If you are active for a while, your telling your brain it's in that 12-hour cycle. If your inactive, your telling it your in your inactive cycle.

Comment author: bbleeker 12 August 2016 06:45:59PM 3 points [-]

More like 1/100000, and then when they thaw you you'll be brain damaged and have to live in an institution forever. They don't really know how to do this yet. How far along are they now? Have they frozen and thawed a mouse yet, and did it behave the same as before? I won't let them freeze me earlier than that, because there's essentially no chance I'll be even able to walk and talk, let alone be someone present me would recognize as 'me'.

Comment author: Prometheus 14 August 2016 08:04:04PM *  0 points [-]

21st Century Medicine cryopreserved and revived a rabbit kidney and planted inside a living rabbit. The kidney was still able to function. In a more recent study, memory retention seemed possible after cryopreservation, as mentioned. On top of this, 21st Century Medicine cryopreserved and thawed a rabbit brain with little damage: http://www.cryonics.org/news/mammal-brain-frozen-and-thawed-out-perfectly-for-first-time

Comment author: The_Jaded_One 11 August 2016 09:36:19PM 2 points [-]

Nope, but my finances are pretty dire right now, though when I do I will certainly post about it. Thanks for asking.

Comment author: Prometheus 12 August 2016 04:35:44AM 2 points [-]

But won't it be difficult convincing others to sign up (and sign up as soon as possible) if you are not signed up yourself? Even if it is financial, many people live paycheck-to-paycheck, but I believe could still afford cryonic preservation.

Comment author: Prometheus 11 August 2016 12:41:49AM 0 points [-]

(Somehow I posted this in the wrong place the first time, so I'm posting it here now.) Hi, I first discovered this site a few years ago, but never really participated on it. Looking back, it appears I only commented once or twice, saying something condescending about morality. Recently, I rediscovered the site, because I started noticing updates on a Facebook group (no longer) affiliated with it. What's funny is I only realized I had an account when I tried to register under the exact same User Name. I've started reading the sequences and am interested in participating in the discussions. I've thought intensely about certain topics since I was young, but I didn't really apply a scientific (or rationalist) approach to it until my Junior year of college, when I joined an Atheist community at my school. Many times, I see different sides to an issue. This isn't to say I stay on the fence for everything, but I understand most situations are complicated with at least some conflicting ideals.

Comment author: Prometheus 09 August 2016 03:53:37AM 0 points [-]

Hi, I first discovered this site a few years ago, but never really participated on it. Looking back, it appears I only commented once or twice, saying something condescending about morality. Recently, I rediscovered the site, because I started noticing updates on a Facebook group (no longer) affiliated with it. What's funny is I only realized I had an account when I tried to register under the exact same User Name. I've started reading the sequences and am interested in participating in the discussions. I've thought intensely about certain topics since I was young, but I didn't really apply a scientific (or rationalist) approach to it until my Junior year of college, when I joined an Atheist community at my school. Many times, I see different sides to an issue. This isn't to say I stay on the fence for everything, but I understand most situations are complicated with at least some conflicting ideals. Looking forward to getting mercilessly pummeled when I say something irrational or factually incorrect.

Comment author: Eugine_Nier 22 May 2013 05:21:27AM 2 points [-]

Cool, I'm glad I've finally found someone who won't object to my hobby of boiling babies alive.

Comment author: Prometheus 24 May 2013 06:50:11AM -1 points [-]

I would certainly have objection. I would just make sure my objection wasn't on the fragile grounds of moral objection. Moral objection is fragile because there is no collective or objective definition to it. Using subjective morals to object to it would be like making-up rules to a game you never asked to play with me.

Comment author: Prometheus 21 May 2013 05:45:15AM 0 points [-]

I don't see why some of you think it is vital to have a mentally-healthy participant. The purpose would be to achieve reanimation for the first time. Even if the person did attempt suicide afterward, the experiment would have by then be validated. As soon as reanimation was actually achieved, more participants would most likely follow. The true opponent of this, of course, is the illegality of suicide and the fact many cryogenic preservations are paid for by life insurance companies, who usually refuse suicide cases.

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