Less Wrong is a community blog devoted to refining the art of human rationality. Please visit our About page for more information.

Comment author: knb 02 May 2016 10:51:30AM *  1 point [-]

BBC News is running a story claiming that the creator of Bitcoin known as Satoshi Nakamoto is an Australian named Craig Wright.

Comment author: VincentYu 02 May 2016 01:37:43PM 0 points [-]

Do we know which country Wright was living in during 2010?

Comment author: gwern 22 March 2016 08:28:29PM 0 points [-]
Comment author: VincentYu 24 March 2016 02:52:52AM 2 points [-]
Comment author: gwern 22 March 2016 08:28:29PM 0 points [-]
Comment author: VincentYu 23 March 2016 02:53:48PM 1 point [-]

Requested.

Comment author: gwern 23 February 2016 02:08:58AM *  0 points [-]
Comment author: VincentYu 03 March 2016 09:48:30AM *  2 points [-]
Comment author: username2 14 December 2015 10:41:25PM 0 points [-]

I'm intersted in polyphasic sleep.

Wikipedia notes:

In order to gain more time awake in the day, Buckminster Fuller reportedly advocated a regimen consisting of 30-minute naps every six hours. The short article about Fuller's nap schedule in Time in 1943, which also refers to such a schedule as "intermittent sleeping," says that he maintained it for two years, and further notes "he had to quit because his schedule conflicted with that of his business associates, who insisted on sleeping like other men."[17]

[...]

"Dymaxion Sleep". Time Magazine. 1943-10-11. Archived from the original on 2013-10-08. Retrieved 2013-12-27.Closed access

The Time archive isn't accessible via SciHub. Can someone gave me the article through another way?

Comment author: VincentYu 19 February 2016 04:25:52AM *  1 point [-]

The article is available on various websites by exact phrase searching, but there are some minor transcription errors in these copies. I've transcribed it below using Google's copy of the scanned article to correct these errors. There seems to be a relevant captioned figure (maybe a photo of Fuller?) on p. 63 of the magazine that is missing from the scan.


Dymaxion Sleep

Sleep is just a bad habit. So said Socrates and Samuel Johnson, and so for years has thought grey-haired Richard Buckminster Fuller, futurific [sic] inventor of the Dymaxion* house (Time, Aug. 22, 1932), the Dymaxion car and the Dymaxion globe. Fuller made a deliberate attempt to break the sleep habit, with excellent results. Last week he announced his Dymaxion system of sleeping. Two hours of sleep a day, he said firmly, is plenty.

Fuller reasoned that man has a primary store of energy, quickly replenished, and a secondary reserve (second wind) that takes longer to restore. Therefore, he thought, a man should be able to cut his rest periods shorter by relaxing as soon as he has used up his primary energy. Fuller trained himself to take a nap at the first sign of fatigue (i.e., when his attention to his work began to wander). These intervals came about every six hours; after a half-hour's nap he was completely refreshed.

For two years Fuller thus averaged two hours of sleep in 24. Result: “The most vigorous and alert condition I have ever enjoyed.” Life-insurance doctors who examined him found him sound as a nut. Eventually he had to quit because his schedule conflicted with that of his business associates, who insisted on sleeping like other men. Now working for the Foreign Economic Administration, Buckminster Fuller finds Dymaxion working and sleeping out of the question. But he wishes the nation's “key thinkers” could adopt his schedule; he is convinced it would shorten the war.

Intermittent sleeping was not originated by Fuller, has respectable scientific backing. [sic] Last week the Industrial Bulletin of Arthur D. Little, Inc., famed Cambridge, Mass. research firm, which published Fuller's sleeping plan, noted a strong point in its favor: most sleep investigators agree that the first hours of sleep are the soundest. Some pro-Fuller evidence:

  • Photographs and electric devices to record movements show that the average sleeper, who changes position at least 40 times during an eight-hour stretch, is quietest in the first two hours, then grows progressively more restless.

  • At Colgate University sleep investigator Donald A. Laird found that people awakened after four hours' sleep were just as alert, well-coordinated physically and resistant to fatigue as those who slept eight hours (but they did lose in accuracy and concentration).

* A Fuller word representing “dynamic” and “maximum service.”

Comment author: gwern 16 December 2015 07:07:09PM 1 point [-]
  • DeLuca, A.M., Kranda, K.C., 1992. "Environmental enrichment in a large animal facility". Lab Animal 21, 38–44. Not in Google, just a cite in Google Scholar, not in Libgen, university access only goes back to 2010, and finally, the Lab Animal website doesn't seem to index earlier than 1993 so further info is not available. (/r/scholar)
Comment author: VincentYu 19 February 2016 03:47:43AM 1 point [-]

Here. Figures 4 and 5 are missing from the scan that I received. Dope ads.

Comment author: gwern 16 December 2015 07:07:09PM 1 point [-]
  • DeLuca, A.M., Kranda, K.C., 1992. "Environmental enrichment in a large animal facility". Lab Animal 21, 38–44. Not in Google, just a cite in Google Scholar, not in Libgen, university access only goes back to 2010, and finally, the Lab Animal website doesn't seem to index earlier than 1993 so further info is not available. (/r/scholar)
Comment author: VincentYu 13 February 2016 03:54:04AM 0 points [-]

Requested.

Comment author: ESRogs 09 December 2015 10:15:10AM 10 points [-]

Gwern has written an article for Wired, allegedly revealing the true identity of Satoshi Nakamoto:

http://www.wired.com/2015/12/bitcoins-creator-satoshi-nakamoto-is-probably-this-unknown-australian-genius/

Comment author: VincentYu 11 December 2015 11:29:42AM 4 points [-]

From the linked Wired article:

The PGP key associated with Nakamoto’s email address and references to an upcoming “cryptocurrency paper” and “triple entry accounting” were added sometime after 2013.

Gwern's comment in the Reddit thread:

[...] this is why we put our effort into nailing down the creation and modification dates of the blog post in third-party archives like the IA and Google Reader.

These comments seem to partly refer to the 2013 mass archive of Google Reader just before it was discontinued. For others who want to examine the data: the relevant WARC records for gse-compliance.blogspot.com are in line 110789824 to line 110796183 of greader_20130604001315.megawarc.warc, which is about three-quarters of the way into the file. I haven't checked the directory and stats grabs and don't plan to, as I don't want to spend any more time on this.

NB: As for any other large compressed archives, if you plan on saving the data, then I suggest decompressing the stream as you download it and recompressing into a seekable structure. Btrfs with compression works well, but blocked compression implementations like bgzip should also work in a pinch. If you leave the archive as a single compressed stream, then you'll pull all your hair out when you try to look through the data.

Comment author: gwern 02 December 2015 04:45:30PM *  2 points [-]

Thanks. I wasted a bunch of money on catnip when it turned out my cat was immune, which I didn't even know was a thing.

After reading up on it, it seemed like there were gaps in the research literature - most of it was hopelessly old and inaccessible, there was no single estimate for how frequently cats respond to catnip and substitutes (so I could meta-analyze/multilevel-model this easily), and no data on the relationships of responses within a cat (so if your cat is immune to catnip, what do you optimally try next?) but this is easy to experiment with since cats are common (I've already gotten set up with several cat toys impregnated with catnip/valerian/honeysuckle so I can test each cat I run into with a battery of stimulants).

So after jailbreaking all the relevant literature, maybe run an online survey of catowners, then combine everything to get the population frequency of catnip response, and then begin experimenting with available cats to get an idea of whether responses are correlated and how frequently cats respond to each stimulant. Then catowners will know the risk of catnip immunity and each stimulant they should try next. See http://www.gwern.net/catnip

A minor contribution, perhaps, but there are a lot of catowners out there and it would be nice to bring some clarity to this area.

Comment author: VincentYu 04 December 2015 02:18:24PM 0 points [-]

3. Here.

Huh. I never knew there were so many other plants that had similar effects on cats.

Anyway, best of luck getting Todd's work… and getting cats high.

Comment author: gwern 26 November 2015 02:04:09AM *  0 points [-]

Catnip papers:

  1. Hatch RC. "Effect of drugs on catnip (Nepeta cataria) induced pleasure behavior in cats". American Journal of Veterinary Research 1972; 33: 143-155. (/r/scholar couldn't help.)
  2. Todd, Neil Bowman 1963. "The catnip response". Doctoral dissertation, Harvard (ocm05134795) (likewise, no joy on /r/scholar) EDIT: got it!

    Maybe someone can get a scan via ILL? The library entry has an option 'Scan and deliver', which sounds promising, but requires a Harvard account. In general, Harvard seems to provide reasonable access: http://asklib.hcl.harvard.edu/faq/81789

Misc:

  • 3. "The Placebo in medicine: Editorial", Medical Press, June 1890, pg 642 (volume unknown: vol 101?)

    'Medical Press' here is the English journal Medical Press, sometimes also named London medical press and circular, which began as "Dublin Medical Press on January 9, 1839, later as the Dublin Medical Press and Circular and finally as the Medical Press and Circular".

    There's no official site and almost the entire run of the journal would be public domain now, but the volumes for 1890 do not seem to have been digitized, going by HathiTrust & IA/Google Books. There are a few quotations from the editorial floating around (eg "We feel sorry for it, but apparently the law does not think well of placebos"), with a long quotation in ch1 of Follies and Fallacies in Medicine (pg3/15), but those don't turn up any copies anywhere. (/r/scholar)

Comment author: VincentYu 02 December 2015 02:34:11PM 1 point [-]
  1. Hatch.

Why the interest in catnip?

View more: Next