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In response to comment by [deleted] on Are wireheads happy?
Comment author: diegocaleiro 06 January 2011 01:58:08AM 9 points [-]

Wow, this is unexpected in so many levels for me. You have access to happiness research yet you would stick to what you want instead. I don't mean to insult or think there is anything wrong, I'm just genuinely staggered at the fact.

I have read some thousands of pgs in happiness research, and started to follow advice. I'm more generous, I take long walks, I cherish friendships, I care very little for a long career, I go to evolutionary envinroments all the time (the park, swimming pools and beaches) I pursue objectives which really ought to make me say "I was doing something I consider important" and ignore money, having children, and some parts of familial obligations.

We had the same info, and we took such different paths...... this is awesome.

So I suppose I am much happier but am in a constant struggle not to want lots of things that I naturally would. So I'm in a kind of strenuous effort of self-control leading to constant bliss. I suppose that you are less happier (though probably not in any way perceivable from a first person perspective) but way more relaxed, prone to be guided by your desires and wishes, and willing to actually go there and do that thing you feel like doing.....

I wish I was you for two weeks or something, if only that were possible, and then I came back....

Comment author: ramanspectre 17 January 2012 03:44:13AM 1 point [-]

"I suppose that you are less happier (though probably not in any way perceivable from a first person perspective) but way more relaxed, prone to be guided by your desires and wishes, and willing to actually go there and do that thing you feel like doing....."

What makes you think that the person you are responding to is more relaxed? You'd think that constantly pursuing wants would make them less relaxed since it takes a lot of energy to pursue worldly things.

And, what you think that you aren't relaxed?

Comment author: ramanspectre 11 May 2011 06:12:57AM *  1 point [-]

Would you consider a topic related to the "herding cats" category?

Mentoring, that is.

Lack of engagement with the established members is definitely a big barrier encountered by newcomers. You wouldn't expect to gain converts as a missionary just by uploading the Holy Bible to the internet page by page and giving each page a comments section, or by posting your personal insights about your religion onto this site. And yet, this is essentially what newcomers experience on LW.

I like your idea to get veterans of this community to have a conversation with newcomers, but I don't think just one conversation is enough. If this was taken one step further, then we could have a system similar to the university research system. One "professor" takes on a group of "undergrads" and guides them on their way to overcoming their biases. Another benefit would be that each student now has an immediate group of people at about the same rationality level with whom they can discuss what they are currently learning, and the leader can recognize if the group is covering new ground or if they are beginning to miss the point.

This is essentially how the Bayesian Conspiracy system works in the beisutsukai series, anyway. It would be incredibly cool, especially to "students" like me, if you "sensei"s actually went ahead and implemented this system.

Edit: the actual implementation depends on the geographic distribution of people willing to become teachers. If most of the teachers are just concentrated in the Silicon Valley area, then maybe an online system could work, where each "group" of learners communicates with each other through a mailing list. When the community gets big enough, some of the regional meet-ups could turn into sessions for the Bayesian Conspiracy.