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JohnWittle comments on The Best Textbooks on Every Subject - Less Wrong

167 Post author: lukeprog 16 January 2011 08:30AM

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Comment author: JohnWittle 06 April 2013 05:34:02PM 1 point [-]

To a non string theorist, string theory seems like a theory which makes few testable predictions, like phlogiston. That's the feel I got from it from whenever I read all the relevant Wikipedia articles, anyway. If it is not like phlogiston, but actually useful for designing experiments, then obviously I concede.

My annoyance came from the fact that my 06:45:05 comment got a few down votes, while the parent got deleted for reasons unknown. I can't remember who the parent was, or what it said, and it bothers me that they deleted their post, while I feel an obligation to not delete my own downvote-gathering comment for reasons like honesty and the general sense that I really meant what the comment said at the time, which makes it useful for archival purposes.

Comment author: whowhowho 06 April 2013 06:17:02PM -1 points [-]

To a non string theorist, string theory seems like a theory which makes few testable predictions, like phlogiston

it made testable predictions and was falsified for them. There are a lot of retrodictive and purely theoretical constraints on a candidate ToE, they have to be pretty good just to be in the running.

Comment author: JoshuaZ 10 May 2013 03:03:01AM 0 points [-]

it made testable predictions and was falsified for them

Do you have specific examples in mind?

Comment author: whowhowho 12 May 2013 02:42:09PM 0 points [-]

Phlogiston. Falsified because combusted materials gain weight.

Comment author: JoshuaZ 12 May 2013 03:33:02PM 0 points [-]

Ah, I was confused by your statement and thought that "it" meant string theory.