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Normal_Anomaly comments on Philosophy: A Diseased Discipline - Less Wrong

88 Post author: lukeprog 28 March 2011 07:31PM

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Comment author: Normal_Anomaly 30 March 2011 01:37:18PM 3 points [-]

Most posts published around the same time have similar Karma level. Earliest posts or highly linked-to posts get more Karma, but people either rarely get far in reading of the archives, or their impulse to upvote atrophies by the time they've read hundreds of posts,...

Also, many users read the early posts while still in the lurker stage, at which point they can't upvote.

Comment author: David_Gerard 30 March 2011 01:57:05PM -1 points [-]

Also, many users read the early posts while still in the lurker stage, at which point they can't upvote.

Do we actually know this?

Comment author: Normal_Anomaly 30 March 2011 02:05:40PM 0 points [-]

Well, whenever somebody starts posting and doesn't act like they've already read the sequences, they get told to go read the sequences and come back afterward.

Also, in the past year or so many new users have joined the site from MoR, and the link in the MoR author's notes goes to the main sequences list. I know that I at least decided to join LW when MoR linked me to the sequences and I liked them.

Comment author: David_Gerard 30 March 2011 02:30:46PM 3 points [-]

they get told to go read the sequences and come back afterward.

I haven't seen this in several months (and I've been watching); the admonishment seems to have vanished from the local meme selection. More often, someone links to a specific apposite post, or possibly sequence.

It's just entirely unclear how we'd actually measure whether people who read the sequences do so before or after logging in.

(I'd suspect not, given they're a million words of text and a few million of accompanying comments, but then that's not even an anecdote ...)

Comment author: wedrifid 30 March 2011 03:16:25PM 16 points [-]

If you read the sequences before LessWrong was created upvote this comment.

Comment author: Normal_Anomaly 30 March 2011 02:42:16PM *  9 points [-]

Poll: If you read the sequences after opening your account, upvote this comment.

Comment author: Normal_Anomaly 30 March 2011 02:42:23PM *  25 points [-]

Poll: If you read the sequences before opening your account, upvote this comment.

Comment author: Normal_Anomaly 30 March 2011 02:41:12PM 2 points [-]

I haven't seen this in several months (and I've been watching); the admonishment seems to have vanished from the local meme selection. More often, someone links to a specific apposite post, or possibly sequence.

You may be right. I think there has been less of that lately.

It's just entirely unclear how we'd actually measure whether people who read the sequences do so before or after logging in.

I wouldn't say it's entirely unclear. I'm curious enough to start a poll.

Comment author: David_Gerard 30 March 2011 02:59:58PM -1 points [-]

Could also do with "Poll: If you still haven't read the sequences, upvote this comment."

Comment author: Normal_Anomaly 30 March 2011 03:22:02PM 0 points [-]

I'd been considering that, and since you agree I went and added it.

Comment author: Desrtopa 30 March 2011 10:20:50PM 1 point [-]

I think this has mainly declined after a number of posts discussing the sheer length of the sequences and the deceptive difficulty of the demand, and potential ways to make the burden easier.

Comment author: Normal_Anomaly 30 March 2011 03:21:21PM 1 point [-]

Poll: If you haven't read the sequences yet, upvote this comment.

Comment author: Desrtopa 30 March 2011 10:21:48PM 2 points [-]

Should this perhaps be made into a discussion article where it will be noticed more?

Comment author: Normal_Anomaly 31 March 2011 12:20:33AM 0 points [-]

I'm tempted to start a poll to see if people think I should make this a discussion article, but I will restrain myself. I'll just go ahead and post the discussion article: there's been enough traffic in the poll that it apparently interests people.