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CAE_Jones comments on Lifestyle interventions to increase longevity - Less Wrong

121 Post author: RomeoStevens 28 February 2014 06:28AM

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Comment author: CAE_Jones 27 February 2014 06:06:05AM 1 point [-]

I am considering writing a program that will launch this page in my web browser every few hours.

(While most of these interventions are things with a surprisingly high cost in terms of stress, the one I like the least but am least stressed about is the recommendation to eat more fish. I am not a fan (nor much of an enemy) of fish. I will gladly save any recommended recipes that manage to include fish and all its benefits without making it overly obvious that I'm eating fish. I could always try and self-modify so that I no longer treat fish as pretty far down the preferred meat hierarchy, but using it in something more desirable in general sounds way more fun. Bonus points if it's something well balanced.)

Comment author: ephion 27 February 2014 03:40:00PM 3 points [-]

Have you had a seared tuna steak? Cooked properly, it's one of the tastiest things I've ever eaten.

Comment author: Alejandro1 27 February 2014 02:22:51PM *  1 point [-]

Here is a very simple recipe for fish that doesn't feel like fish. I made it yesterday :). In addition to being simple, it is easily tweak able/optimizable for your tastes and dietary needs. All quantities are rough approximations:

Throw in a pot 1 onion (chopped), 4 celery sticks (chopped), 1 potato (diced), 2 cod fillets, and 2-3 cups of watered tomato sauce. (The one I use is a super-simple homemade one: 2 tablespoons tomato paste, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 2 cups water, 1 tablespoon sugar, and salt and pepper to the taste). Bring to the boil and simmer until cooked. (I do it in a pressure cooker, where it takes 20-25 minutes. In a normal pot it would take longer and you probably need to use more water). And there you have it. The defining taste is the celery in tomato sauce; the fish (which breaks down) and the potato are just white chunks in it giving the feelings of protein and starch without changing the taste. Makes 3-4 servings.

Comment author: RomeoStevens 27 February 2014 06:18:35AM 1 point [-]

You can get sashimi delivered to your house frozen for around $25 a pound.

Comment author: atorm 27 February 2014 12:52:02PM 2 points [-]

That seems really expensive.

Comment author: roystgnr 27 February 2014 10:26:49PM 0 points [-]

If you refer to "fish" rather than a particular species (or at least to "red fish" vs "white fish"?) then I have to wonder which varieties you've tried. There are significant enough differences between tuna, cod, salmon, and tilapia, for instance, that I would not be surprised to find a person whose liked/disliked any combination of the four.

Comment author: [deleted] 28 February 2014 09:46:40PM 1 point [-]

If you refer to "fish" rather than a particular species (or at least to "red fish" vs "white fish"?) then I have to wonder which varieties you've tried. There are significant enough differences between tuna, cod, salmon, and tilapia, for instance, that I would not be surprised to find a person whose liked/disliked any combination of the four.

Do all kinds of fish have the same health effects, BTW? What about molluscs and crustaceans?

Comment author: juliawise 01 March 2014 02:27:52AM *  5 points [-]
Comment author: NancyLebovitz 27 February 2014 03:37:51PM 0 points [-]

What do you want concealed about fish?

Would small bits of fish cooked in a strong-flavored sauce be enough to make the experience less fishy?

Comment author: Alicorn 27 February 2014 10:18:02PM -1 points [-]

I like to drown my slab-in-the-oven type fish in hollandaise sauce, or garlic, or both. Ceviche is surprisingly easy and can be full of non-fish flavors, especially if you use a mild (sushi-grade) fish and plenty of avocado and onion and put it on nice crackers.